Let’s have a little bit moor – @drinkmoorbeer: Hoppiness

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I love the smell of manure,
I love the smell of the poor,
I love the smell of Frank Muir.
So, come on let’s have a look at it,
come along now let’s have a sniff of it,
come along now let’s have a little bit moor…

 

As my new favourite beer shop in Yarnton Nurseries stocks a whole pile of exciting stuff, I find myself coming across loads of beers from brewer’s that I’ve been meaning to try for ages…

This one: Moor Beer: Hoppiness.  In a tin can.

Never fear the can.  If you do you’re a fool.  It’ll be fresher, not light struck and have more room for the artwork.  It also means that I don’t feel duty-bound to save yet another bottle.

We cleared out the shed on Tuesday.  I have three hundred or so empty bottles now.  Ulp!

From the can and into a glass Hoppiness is a nice colour and has a lovely sea-slick head.  Not vastly hoppy in the aroma, but solid enough for my liking – with bristly, prickly bits and some good old resinous dank.

Taste-wise, there’s a nice quenching bitterness, with a big old side order of hop and a non-intrusive warming alcohol.

I find that with English hoppy beers the hopping seems somehow more refined than the US Pales and IPAs; with the US beers seeming to be more “blaring” than the English ones; which I find on the whole to be more muted, but actually more complex and interesting for it…

The bitterness goes on throughout the swallow and is pervasive enough to make you want to crack open another can.

I liked it.

It’s not going to set your world aflame and send you running to tell all your friends about a new taste sensation, but it’ll satisfy and quench in more than equal measure…in fact it’s one of those few hoppy beers where you’ll be happy to have a fair few of…even if it’s 6.7%!

…and that’s the mark of very good beer indeed…

See here: http://moorbeer.co.uk/1472-2/

DunkelWeisse – The Maltiest of Wheat Beers

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I’m happy to say that wanting to brew is an itch that has returned to me in the last week or so….and you know what to do with a good itch, don’t you?

I must admit that since trying Weihenstephaner Dunkel Weisse and enjoying it enormously (review to follow at some point) I’ve been desperate to make a clone.

As per usual, the web was full of useful, unhelpful and downright bizarre advice – including one recipe for this dark WHEAT beer that had no wheat in the grain bill at all?  I know we’re not all Rheinehetsgebot puritans, but that’s plain mental…

Fortunately the BJCP were on hand to give me some hints and tips as regards the style and vaguely which ballpark I should be playing in: http://www.bjcp.org/docs/2015_Guidelines_Beer.pdf (the Dunkels Weizen section)

So I needed a fairly normal wheat, but this time with a solid malty backbone.  The colour seems to be pretty important too as it should be dark enough to distinguish it from the standard wheats.  Obviously if I was a braver, more resourceful and more time-rich brewer I’d be decocting the hell out of the wort – which would really make malts heavier and just that bit darker.

But as I’m none of those things right now, I aimed to make it right with some speciality malt additions:

Dunkel Weizen

That big old dose of Munich ought to help bring a more bready taste and aroma, with the CaraAroma really pushing the malt angle.  The Carafa II is just there to bring the colour on a bit, but as it’s a de-husked grain there’ll be no burnt astringency nastiness.

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I mashed as per my normal Braumeister/Brewmaster regime (see here: https://yeastismybitch.com/2015/11/05/no-name-hefeweizen-iii/)

I tasted a little as I got to near to the end of the boil and it was fantastically malty and very clean tasting.  I got 22L of 1053 OG wort into the fermenter, which was a bit off the mark, but it’s no biggie…

Hopefully, with the grain bill, mash and boil all going of well we should be in for a treat.

…that is, as long as the weather doesn’t go and ruin it.

England is currently basking – more like: flaked out, beaten-up and being partially desiccated – in some high summer temperatures.  Overnight it didn’t drop below 20c in my utility room, which meant that everyone’s favourite mentalist yeast – WLP300 – had started up within 6 hours of being pitched (no starter, so sue me.  I live on the edge, man.)

Outside it’s expected to hit 27C today (80ish F in old/US money) and that, with an already crazy exothermic ferment going on could see us going high enough to start chucking out harsh fusel alcohols…

However, old-school problems demand old school solutions: I wrapped an old sweatshirt around the carboy and made sure that it was light-tight, and then doused the whole thing in cold water.  I’ll be regularly damping down this week, I guess.  The evaporating water should help to cool the whole thing down a bit.  I Hope.

Tomorrow we might get to 30C…yikes.

…this now leaves me wishing two things:

One, that I’d gone and done a Saison instead.  I’d have just let the Saison do what it wanted.  30C?  Yeah, fill your boots, go crazy…create all the Saison character you like Mr Dupont Strain…

…and two, I’m blimmin’ glad I didn’t do anything involving a fairly standard ale yeast….