Pour away your isotonic shit and drink this instead – Augustiner: Dunkel

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Do you spend hundreds of pounds on ridiculous sports drinks and the such-like?  You do?  Well in my opinion you’re wasting money, money that could be far better spent on beer.

Especially beer like Augustiner Dunkel.

Augustiner Dunkel is a very solid and very dark beer indeed – with so much malt you could probably stand a spoon up in it.

With an aroma not far off a bag of demerera sugar and tasting like glazed and roasted chestnuts, it’s one hell of a pick-me-up.

There’s an ample carbonation and some spicy notes that add to the fun, too.

There’s also pretty much zero in the way of bitterness – so even damp-eyed, soft people, can enjoy it…

Dunkel is a style that’s so (to my mind) refreshing, sustaining and fluid replacing, and I think it’s just the sort of thing we should all be drinking after vigorous physical activity*:

Runners – stock up on it for post-race refreshment, MAMILs (look it up!) – keep some at cellar temperature to enjoy when you stagger back in the door all bow-legged and scrotally-damaged.

I’m going to get a stock in for the – all-too-inevitable – leaf-sweeping and garden-buggering-about that comes my way at this time of year.

In short: pour all the isotonic shit down the sink and drink Dunkel instead!

http://www.augustiner-braeu.de/en/unser-bier.html#

(*PS: It’s worth noting that I have precisely zero in the way of medical training, but have strong suspicions that a lot of people are wasting their money on pointless sugary bullshit)

On yer bike – @OakhamAles: Green Devil IPA

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You know, I reckon, there’s two very different sorts of hoppy beer in this funny little world of ours…

First off, there’s American hoppy beer: which I associate with resinous and dank and sticky buds and citrus and grapefruit peel and bitter and marmalade – all in a tumult, just like that.

Then there’s English hoppy beer – which is still assertive and has those same American themes but somehow less full-bore and with more subtleties – such as delicate floral notes and honey and summer.

If it’s pines in an English-hoppy beer then it’s sun-soaked Lebanese cyprus by a greek taverna – rather than pine needles bunging up the Hoover at Christmas.

I like both styles equally…

There’s days when only a solid American IPA style will do: everything at maximum, with the amps cranked up to 11 – a headlong break-neck trip through hop city on a Harley.

Then there’s other days when you need a bracing yomp through the hills and fields, taking in the forests and the rioutous summer meadows; earthy, sensual and provocative to the senses – which is what you seem to get from an English hoppy beer.

Needless to say, there’s US brewers making great English-style hoppy beer, and some great US-inspired hoppy beer from brewers on this side of the water…

Speaking of brewers from this side of the water, lets take a look at Oakham’s Green Devil IPA…

Green Devil IPA is a curious mix of both hoppy beer styles.  I guess I can best describe it as a bit like mountain-biking:  it’s all full-on downhill craziness: mad hops and assertive bitterness; but if you take the time to stop for a bit and take your helmet off, you’ll find yourself in a delicate and sensual surroundings.

The hops in the nose are big and bold, lightly vegetative and with a lively playfulness.   The colour is fresh-cast-bullion and the head stays soapy-foamy right to the end.  I got pines, lemons and hints of grapefruit in the taste with a lightly but dangerously drinkable body.  The bitterness kept me going back for more until I found myself empty-glassed and slightly sad at not having more on hand.

If I were you I’d get on your bike and get some today.

See detail of it here: http://www.oakhamales.com/greendevilipa.html

Elvis is still very much in the building – @Brewdog: Elvis Juice

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Look around you.  It’s bloody September already…and that’s “already” as in the English meaning; rather than the US, hand-on-hips, “already” that they seem to indulge in…God love them.

So it’s been a while since I’ve blogged – life is getting in the way, and that’s why I’m changing the way I do reviews.  From now on: they’ll be shorter, snappier and hopefully a bit less rambling.  I’d like to examine the beer as a whole, rather than pick it to bits and look at the parts.

So here we go with the first attempt:

Elvis Juice?  I’ve no idea why, but it’s Brewdog and they know what they’re doing – so they can do what they like…doesn’t bother me.

I had mine poured out of a can – and by holy crikey, as soon as the ring pull is off do you get a waft of hops!  It’s like someone’s rammed  a grapefruit and sherbert boiled sweet up your hooter.

And what a bloody marvellously joyous aroma it is:  candy-citrus with some resin and dank; it’s an aroma I’ve never experienced in a beer before.  Original and beautiful.  I’m willing to bet that the grapefruit juice went in too…probably post-fermentation, but I could be wrong and frequently am.

It’s a good colour, and the head’s nice.  But it’s that bloody aroma that gets me every time.

Damn it’s good to drink too.  Lively and candy-citrus hoppy, it’s maybe a tad too sweet?  But it’s light on it’s feet and treacherously drinkable – despite the 6.5% ABV.

Elvis Juice is probably the most cheerful beer you’ll drink all year…

See it here: https://www.brewdog.com/beer/amplified/elvis-juice

Let’s have a little bit moor – @drinkmoorbeer: Hoppiness

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I love the smell of manure,
I love the smell of the poor,
I love the smell of Frank Muir.
So, come on let’s have a look at it,
come along now let’s have a sniff of it,
come along now let’s have a little bit moor…

 

As my new favourite beer shop in Yarnton Nurseries stocks a whole pile of exciting stuff, I find myself coming across loads of beers from brewer’s that I’ve been meaning to try for ages…

This one: Moor Beer: Hoppiness.  In a tin can.

Never fear the can.  If you do you’re a fool.  It’ll be fresher, not light struck and have more room for the artwork.  It also means that I don’t feel duty-bound to save yet another bottle.

We cleared out the shed on Tuesday.  I have three hundred or so empty bottles now.  Ulp!

From the can and into a glass Hoppiness is a nice colour and has a lovely sea-slick head.  Not vastly hoppy in the aroma, but solid enough for my liking – with bristly, prickly bits and some good old resinous dank.

Taste-wise, there’s a nice quenching bitterness, with a big old side order of hop and a non-intrusive warming alcohol.

I find that with English hoppy beers the hopping seems somehow more refined than the US Pales and IPAs; with the US beers seeming to be more “blaring” than the English ones; which I find on the whole to be more muted, but actually more complex and interesting for it…

The bitterness goes on throughout the swallow and is pervasive enough to make you want to crack open another can.

I liked it.

It’s not going to set your world aflame and send you running to tell all your friends about a new taste sensation, but it’ll satisfy and quench in more than equal measure…in fact it’s one of those few hoppy beers where you’ll be happy to have a fair few of…even if it’s 6.7%!

…and that’s the mark of very good beer indeed…

See here: http://moorbeer.co.uk/1472-2/